All posts by sperling

Proper Warm-Up Routines

Actors on stage in a scene

 Every performer has their own personal routine when warming up before rehearsal or for a show. Some directors like when the performers warm up together, and think it can be helpful for creating a cast bond. Though warm ups may differ depending on whether you have rehearsal or a production that day. Check out these ideas for warm ups.

Stretching your Muscles

When warming up for rehearsal you should still be putting your all into warm ups. It’s the time when you feel out your body and get comfortable with your character, so putting your all into warm ups is very important. It exercises your body and stretches you out just like muscles before working out. You wouldn’t think, but there’s actually a muscle that actors workout called your diaphragm that you stretch like any other muscle to perform your best.

Microphone held by hand with dark background

Individual or Group?

Try individual warm ups and group warm ups. Anything goes for rehearsals as long as they’re really working you out. Stick with your individual routine, and allow yourself to warm up as you will to get to know your character the best you can.

Routines

When it comes closer to the opening night of the production, work through some group warm up activities that you’ve practiced. Make a routine of doing group warm ups as opening night slowly approaches. These group activities help boost morale, and increase chemistry and bonds between cast members.

Actor looking off into distance

Experience Helps Warm-Ups

As you gain experience with different types of productions, warming up becomes easier. It will make more sense as to which warm up routine should be done with which type of productions/characters.

Next time you’re planning your set, consider Backdrops by Charles H. Stewart. Call us at (978) 682-5757 or visit our website at https://charleshstewart.com/

 

How Does Set Design Influence a Production?

When you’re hosting a production, the set in which you design is a predominant aspect in determining how your audience will perceive your show. Sometimes the best way to get exactly what you want means designing yourself. If you have resources to work with, consider these ideas.

There are many questions and factors that go into planning and designing a set. Budgeting details need to be worked out as well as available work hours for crew to get going. When purchasing supplies, you of course want to make the best decisions for most affordable price.

Designing a perfect set and making things look the way you imagined doesn’t have to be expensive and pricy. When you plan details out, you can categorize elements of the set design process: which things you can do yourself, which elements you are able to rent, and which you must purchase. Then, deciding what to spend money on and what to build yourself comes naturally, thinking so

Renting backdrops and props can be make building the set easier. You’re able to spend less by returning something you may not use again. Renting companies provide help, answer questions and take really good care of their equipment so you know you’ll be getting quality designs.  

A set is the elements of the stage in which the actors interact with. It must be the perfect medium between enough detail, and not too distracting. What goes into your set will be directly related to your production. The backdrop is a very important aspect of the set design in which choosing can be vital to a shows success. You wouldn’t want to choose something inappropriate that doesn’t match your theme, colors that are too distracting, something too dismal, etc.

Movable or mobile elements of your set will help make things easy to take down and thus make more time available for other efforts. When planning the design of a set, the most efficient and movable objects and props are the most ideal.

The more time and effort you spend planning set design, the more easily executed the show will seem. Productions will directly benefit from proper set planning, and finding the best ways to easily and effectively bring your ideas to life.

Next time you’re beginning to plan your next set design, consider how it may be beneficial for you to rent a backdrop from Backdrops by Charles H. Stewart. Call us at (978) 682-5757 or visit our website at https://charleshstewart.com/

Common Questions about Backdrops

If you have an upcoming performance, dance recital, or event that needs that final element to make your presentation unforgettable, a backdrop may be just the answer. Backdrops by Charles Stewart has been the leader in scenic design and backdrop rentals for over 120 years. We carry over 1,500 backdrops, drapes, lames, and scrims for your performance. Not only do we offer a huge variety of backdrops, we have experience that can help you answer all your performance questions accurately. Here are some of the more common things directors, producers, and prop masters ask us when it comes to our products and services.

 

  • What kinds of backdrops and sizes are offered at BCS?

 

Charles H. Stewart offers a wide variety of backdrops designed to accommodate most high quality productions for theatres, schools, dance recitals, corporate events, and the like. Many of our backdrops are inspired by Broadway performances and have been organized into categories that reflect this on our website. For example, our backdrops are searchable by category, show, or even customizable with your unique design in mind. In addition we offer drops in a variety of sizes for your stage. We can create a backdrop of any size to your exact specifications on a custom order. However, our standard sizes for backdrop rentals are mostly 18×42 or 15×36.

 

  • How are the backdrops hung and are they compatible with the equipment at our venue?

 

All of our backdrops come with grommets and tie lines spaced approximately 12-14 inches apart. We ask that you only hang the backdrops using the grommets and tie lines provided. Please do not pin, staple, tack, or tape the backdrops at any time. Our experts can talk to you about how these can be hung and how to do so safely.

 

  • What about rental periods and arrival dates?

 

Our rentals typically are on a week-by-week basis, starting on a Monday and ending on a Monday. If you would like to have the drop ahead of time (and it is available), we may be able to offer (but not guarantee) early delivery. We also offer limited partial week rentals. We use UPS shipping to guarantee tracking for prompt arrival and suggest our clients use the same method for return shipping as well. The shipping is a separate fee. If an emergency arises and you need the drop for a longer period call us immediately so we can make certain that another client does not need the drop.

 

If you have further questions about billing, shipping and backdrop options see our FAQ section on our website or call Charles H. Stewart at (978) 682-5757 – www.charleshstewart.com

Planning Your Broadway Trip!

If you love the theater like we love the theater, then you probably plan trips there as often as you can. However, if you are a novice to Broadway, then you may be looking for tips to get there, enjoy a show, and not break the bank, right? So if you want to head to New York City and see the bright lights of Broadway then here are some ideas on how to make the trip and leave your savings account intact. Let’s plan a Broadway trip!

Getting There – Depending upon the distance you have to travel, you may need to fly, take a train, subway, bus, or all of the above. Watch your favorite websites for the best deal on tickets until you think you have the best option available.

Accomodations – While there are hundreds of travel sites that offer discount hotel prices, we suggest you think outside the box because even the cheapest hotel room will run you quite a bit of money. Try something like staying on a friend’s couch or possibly Airbnb. If all else fails stay right outside of the city or across the river in Jersey for better rates.

Getting Tickets and What to See – Obviously as a theater lover you will want to catch a show or two while you are in town. Check out sites like: Playbill, TheaterMania, and BroadwayWorld. They are fantastic sites for show news and theatre insights to get you in the mood for Broadway!

While you are visiting Broadway, enjoy all there is to see! Remember to look for our backdrops and give us a shout if you see something you love!

 

How to Be a Great Prop Master

The “property master”, often dubbed the prop master or mistress, is the person responsible for purchasing, acquiring, manufacturing, properly placing, and/or overseeing any props needed for a theatrical production. Sounds pretty straight-forward, right? Well, being a prop master is one of the most stressful yet rewarding jobs in theater. Prop professionals have a wide variety of skills and often are considered the “MacGyver” of the productions in that they have the ability to make a wide array of props out of seemingly nothing and on a limited budget. So how do these skillful professionals do it? Here are few hints on how to become a pro of the props.

 

  • Become an Expert Shopper – Most prop masters know where to find the best props, be it from a Goodwill store, a warehouse, or a recent purchase. Knowing where to buy the items and at the best price is one sign of being a pro.
  • Get Organized – Most prop masters are also professional organizers who know where to store each prop and how it can be accessed easily the next time it is needed. Create your own system of sorting and storing props, and you’ll be well on your way to becoming a true prop master.
  • Know the Production – A great prop master knows the production inside and out, including the cues for each scenery change, and when each prop is needed on stage and from which side it should enter.
  • Be Able to Roll-with-it – An expert prop master has to know, when things get crazy on stage or disasters happen, that they need to roll with the punches and think on the fly to come up with viable solutions. Prop masters know how to do this intuitively and are not thrown off by last minute changes.
  • Be Aware of Safety – In many productions the props are so realistic that they may be dangerous. A good prop master is always aware of the safety measures needed to keep the actors and stage hands safe at all times. In such cases, it’s best practice to train the person(s) who will use the prop during the show.  

 

Prop masters may often go overlooked, but their skill and talent are what make the production go off without a hitch. If you are a prop master and want more information about our Backdrops by Charles Stewart, call (978) 682-5757, or visit our website at  www.charleshstewart.com.

 

Keys to a Successful Show

Whether you are putting on a show under the bright lights of Broadway, at a small community theater, or on the stage of a local high school auditorium, all directors and producers want their show be a success. They plan, think ahead, and schedule for every contingency. So how can you make your show a success? Let’s take a closer look at the keys to a successful show.

 

  • Create a Team – All successful shows have one thing in common – a team mentality. Be sure to lead your actors, prop masters, lighting experts, and all the other people that make the show what it is. Ask for input and listen to what is said. Be respectful of all team members’ talents and skills in their respective areas and realize that one person alone does not put on the show. Hire or appoint people whom you trust to all the important positions that will help make your show a smash hit from stage managers to choreographers, to music directors and so on.
  • Set Expectations – Set high expectations for your entire team about attitude, promptness, and respect for you and others in the show. Too many big egos can hurt even the greatest of plot lines.
  • Plan for Disaster – Success doesn’t mean that a show did not encounter troubles along the way, but rather that the team was able to overcome any issues that came its way, whether it was technical difficulties, sick actors, building issues, or any number of things that can throw a monkey wrench into production on show night. Plan accordingly and have a back up ready for every conceivable problem.
  • Learn – Technical aspects of every show can be confusing so get to know the people who control the technology that runs your show from lights to sound to moving props. Knowing how to use all the professional equipment will help stage managers make adjustments quickly if an emergency arises and will also help to manage crew members more effectively.
  • Don’t Ignore the LIttle Things – The adage that “the devil is in the details” is very true when it comes to show business. Take notes during rehearsals and be sure to incorporate the little details that bring the show together to form a masterpiece.
  • Have Fun – Some of the best shows are the ones where you can tell that the performance is a labor of love for all those involved.

 

Call Backdrops by Charles H. Stewart at (978) 682-5757 or visit our website at  www.charleshstewart.com for more guidance and stage backdrops that will make your show a successful show!

Importance of Theater for Children

Are your children commonly exposed to art-rich experiences? Do you bring your child to live theater, or fear doing so because they may not behave or make it through the entire show? If you have not shared the experiences of local theater with your child or possibly taken them on a special trip to the lights, sounds, and magic of Broadway, then you may want to consider it this new year. There are countless studies and research that has been done to show that theater for children is critical to their academic, social, and emotional development. Here is a quick list of the benefits of exposing your child to theater from a young age.

 

  • Increased academic performance in school. “Study after study has shown that the arts are more than fluff. Longitudinal data of 25,000 students involved in the arts, conducted at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education by Dr. James Catterall, shows that consistent participation greatly improves academic performance and signi cantly bumps up standardized test scores. Students who make time for the arts are also more involved in community service, and less likely to drop out of school. And we’re not just talking about upper middle class kids. These facts remain, regardless of a child’s socioeconomic background.” (Source: Rose Theater Chicago)
  • Children who experience live theater and a wide variety of shows with characters that are different than them are more accepting than their less cultured peers of other people’s ideas, religions, sexual orientations, and cultures.
  • Children who visit live performances have lengthened attention spans.
  • Children who view a variety of theater shows have been shown to have increased empathy and understanding of the plight of others and act on that knowledge.
  • Theater fosters creativity and imagination, and allows children to think beyond the storyline.

 

Follow our blog and Facebook postings about opportunities for children to experience the joy of theater. Call Backdrops by Charles H. Stewart at (978) 682-5757 or visit our website at  www.charleshstewart.com for more guidance and stage backdrops that will make your show a hit!

Theater Etiquette

Are you a Broadway theater newcomer? Well, welcome to “the show” and get ready for some amazing theater! Are you nervous about what the proper behavior and attire is for Broadway theatre? Common questions that Broadway first-timers ask are: What is the appropriate attire for the theater? Are refreshments available at the theater? When do I applaud during the performance? Here are just a few of the tips we have for theater etiquette for your next visit to Broadway.

 

  • Dress for a night out. While there is no dress code for Broadway theater, it is not a gym or bar so, therefore, respect the work of the actors by dressing for the occasion.
  • Turn off your phone. Your ringtone or text message buzzing does not “go” with the music of the show.
  • Be quiet and courteous during the show including no talking, unwrapping cough drops, or singing along, even if you know the words!
  • Respect the space of others around you including staying within the boundaries of your seat and keeping your belongings in your area. Many a show has been uncomfortable for audience members if seat neighbors put their feet up or arms stretched out around their chairs.
  • Do not take photos or video of the show. The show is a professional production and should be treated as such.
  • Standing ovations happen often for exceptionally great shows. Feel free to show your love but don’t overdo it by whooping it up or screaming.
  • Save bathroom trips for intermission as the movement of the audience members can distract the actors.

 

If you want more etiquette ideas call Backdrops by Charles H. Stewart at (978) 682-5757 or visit our website at  www.charleshstewart.com for more guidance and stage backdrops that will make your show a hit!

 

Superstitions of the Theater

Do you consider yourself a superstitious person? Do you worry about events that fall on Friday the 13th, or perhaps black cats or stepping on a crack in fear of breaking your mother’s back? If this describes you, then you may fit in well with theater lovers. Historically, there are a number of superstitions that are commonly believed, or at least discussed, when it comes to theater. In fact, you may follow some of these yourself even if you aren’t headed to the theater. For example, have you ever told someone to “break a leg” when they were headed to a big event? That superstitious saying stemmed from the fear of actors hearing “good luck” before a performance believing that evil theater spirits would do the opposite of the words they heard spoken. Let’s take a look at a few other common superstitions that haunt theaters to this day.

 

  • The Ghost Light – Once the lights come on in a theater everything is illuminated and bright, but prior to that time or after the show is over, theaters can be a dark and scary place. The Ghost Light is known today to help guide the first and last person in and out of the theatre, especially in the dark. The ghost light tradition is to leave a single lit bulb upstage center when the theater is empty. Not only is it meant to ward off mischievous specters, but it also allows the stage managers, crewmembers, and actors to find the light switch when entering a vacant theater so that they don’t break their necks while crossing the totally dark stage.
  • Bad Dress Rehearsal, Good OpeningMany stage actors swear that a bad dress rehearsal portends a great opening night. This superstition’s origins are not clear, but maybe a producer or director trying to boost a cast’s morale, but it’s a comforting concept when the final dress goes horribly wrong.
  • Broken Mirror is Bad Luck – We all know of the superstition that breaking a mirror is seven years bad luck. It is believed that breaking a mirror on stage will cause seven years of misfortune for a theatre.  Reflections from mirrors can also be distracting for lights, actors, and audience members.
  • Blue and Silver – It is bad luck to wear the color blue onstage, unless it was countered with something silver. In the earliest days of theater costuming, it was extremely difficult to make blue dye, and thus expensive to purchase. So blue costumes were countered with silver, thus proof of the success of a theater company.

Signs of a Great Stage Manager

In any performance, from the high school level to under the bright lights of Broadway, the stage manager is the glue that holds the show together. This is the person who always knows what’s going on, where it’s happening, and how things are actually progressing. The personality of a stage manager has to be such that he or she can not only deal with the stress of the performance but also the varying personalities of the actors, director, and stage crew. In general, it helps if this person is level-headed, keeps calm under pressure, and is organized. Here are a few more signs that you have a great stage manager working on your show.

 

  • Organized and Prepared – As mentioned above, organization and preplanning is critical to be an effective and successful stage manager. From the first production meeting ‘till the curtain goes down on the final show, the stage manager must be able to juggle multiple schedules from scene blocking, acquisition of props and backdrops, and of course the general running of the show.
  • Knows the Lingo – Any good stage manager must know the lingo of theaters from the stage terms, blocking notes, and of course the cues for every actor and scene change.
  • Excellent Note Takers and Communicators – The stage manager is responsible for pulling together all the parts of the production.  He or she must be able to listen closely during production meetings, learn what needs to be done, and communicate those plans to lighting techs, stage crew, prop masters, and the sound crew so that everyone is on the same page. Without excellent communication, the entire production could go down as an epic fail.
  • The Magic Touch – Stage managers must try to be all things to so many people during a production. One thing that each stage manager should try to do that not all succeed at is making the work fun.

 

If your stage manager is looking for exceptional backdrops for your show, call Backdrops by Charles H. Stewart at (978) 682-5757 or visit our website at  www.charleshstewart.com.